Engage, Expand and Encompass through Technology

Macomb ISD's Universal Design for Learning Initiative

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Frankenstein "Technology Decisions" Introduction

Last Updated: May-06-2010

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Developed By

  Aric Foster
 

Lesson Title

  Frankenstein "Technology Decisions" Introduction
 

Length of Lesson

  Four 73 minute class days
 

Lesson Unit

  Frankenstein
 

Grade

  9-12
 

Subject

  ELA
 

Strand

  Literature and Culture
 

Grade 2

  9-12
 

Subject 2

  ELA
 

Strand 2

  Reading, Listening, and Viewing
 

Michigan Content Expectations

  1.2, 1.3, 1.5, 2.2, 4.1, 4.2
 

Keywords

  Frankenstein, Technology, Decisions
 

Materials

 

Flip video camera(s), internet access, blackboard access, headphones

 

Abstract

 

This lesson is an introduction to the unit where students read Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and connect the novel's themes to their own lives: humans pushing technology too far, using forward thinking to make decisions, learning from the consequences of decisions.

 

Big Idea(s)

 

Literature can teach us valuable life lessons. The advancement of technology is a "real" issue that affects students' lives in a significant way. 

 

Essential Questions

 

a.       How do we know when technology has gone too far?

b.      How do we know when our decisions towards progress were the right ones?

c.       With respect to the technological advancements, just because we can, should we?

d.  How can we learn these lessons from literature?

 

 

Learning Objectives

 

Students will effectively use web-based resources to accomplish tasks.

Students will contemplate how technology and its use affects the human condition.

 

 

Summative Assessment

 

Graphic organizers, video answer, blog reflection, research paper, reading quizzes, final video project

 

Lesson Opening

 

Students do a think/write, pair, share with the following questions. While they do this activity, the “mouse ear” picture will be on the screen. Teacher provides examples as well to help discussion.

a.       How do we know when technology has gone too far?

b.      How do we know when our decisions towards progress were the right ones?

c.       With respect to the technological advancements, just because we can, should we?

 

 Then, students use the CPS Clicker system to comment "True or False" to the following statements. During this survey, random students are called upon (using the random student selector button), to elaborate their thoughts. Insightful discussion ensues.

a.       It is acceptable to use technology to cure diseases.

b.      It is acceptable to use technology to increase food production.

c.       It is acceptable to use technology to make our lawns greener.

d.      It is acceptable to use technology to increase fertility (pregnancy).

e.       It is acceptable to use technology to find a date.

f.        It is acceptable to use technology to choose characteristics of an unborn child: gender, eye color, hair color, etc.

g.       It is acceptable to use technology to improve athletic ability.

h.      It is acceptable to use technology to improve aesthetic appearance.

i.        It is acceptable to use technology to clone humans.

j.        It is acceptable to use technology to create humans.

 


Resource(s) available for this section
 

Lesson Opening Co-teaching Plan

 

Students with special needs will be omitted from being randomly called. In addition, they will be given a paper copy of the questions ahead of time.

 

Exploration

 

1)      Students choose a topic of interest from discussion: cloning, fertility, aesthetics, agriculture or dating. Then, students write the thesis of their future research paper based on the clicker questions. Example: Technology should not be used for the advancement of cloning.  

2)      Students are handed the article entitled “Does Google Make Us Stupid?” Teacher models a think-aloud for one paragraph that shows “talking to the text” (T4) and “metacognition.” Students review the T4 rubric and then the teacher continues the think-aloud for one more paragraph. Then, students read and T4 the text on their own.  

 


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Exploration Co-teaching Plan

 

1) Students could choose from a few theses written for them.

2) Students only have to interpret the graph contained within the article. This graph contains the primary message of the text.

 

Check for Understanding

 

1) Students write their best T4 thought on the board and teacher shares them all.

2) Students discuss what this article has to do with the essential technology questions.

3) After highlighting insightful T4 comments that the students made on the “Does Google Make Us Stupid?” article, the teacher places ten examples on the ELMO to highlight strong ways to “talk to the text.”

 

Check for Understanding Co-teaching Plan

 

Posting comments on the board is voluntary and can be excluded for special needs students.

 

Explanation

 

1)    Students go to the library to work on a web quest. Students have a cause and effect graphic organizer to complete as they do the webquest. This webquest addresses the essential questions promoted by the MISD and uses graphic organizer resources provided by the MISD. Along with completing the graphic organizer, students have to submit answer in groups via vlog using flip video cameras.

2)    Students have a fill in the blank lecture notes sheet for background information about Mary Shelley. Students listen to a podcast that “fills in the blanks.” The podcast is nime minutes and thirty seconds long and it was made with the hardware provided by the MISD and used Audacity to record and edit. The description of this assignment on blackboard read: Normally when teachers have to give you information, they either lecture, ask you to find the information in a book or have you look it up on the internet. Well, as you know, I am a little different. While, we won't spend a ridiculous amount of time learning about Mary Shelley's life, there are several key aspects of her life that will help us contextualize Frankenstein. With this in mind, please listen to the podcast attached to this assignment and complete the "Mary Shelly Guided Lecture" handout. After you complete this document, staple it to the final draft of your "Mary Letter," along with the rubric for the "Mary Letter," when you turn them in on Thursday.

3)    Students had a digital copy and paper copy of an explanation of an assignment to write a letter to Mary Shelley. They listened to a podcast that explained the assignment. The description on blackboard read: The letter to Mary Shelley assignment was given to you in paper form, it is attached digitally to this assignment, it has a rubric, and there is a podcast attached that should answer your questions. Please listen to the podcast then come see me if you have any questions about the assignment. Finally, after you are done listening to both podcasts, please post a comment on the "Podcast" discussion board to comment about the podcasting process. Also, if you are interested in making a podcast of your own, I attached directions in the "External Links" tab.

 

 


Resource(s) available for this section
 

Check for Understanding (2)

 

Students then do a reflection about using the UDL-inspired resources on blackboard. The questions that they answer on blackboard read: On the following discussion board, post your answers to the following questions. In addition, respond to other students' comments. 1) What was your reaction to giving a response on a flip video camera? How did it differ from writing the assignment or typing it or answering it orally in class by raising your hand? Was it easier or harder? Why? Why would you want to (or not want to) do this kind of assessment again? 2) What was your reaction to hearing an explanation of an assignment and a lecture on a podcast? Was it strange? Was it effective? What would you like to change about this procedure? Was it easier or harder than listening to Mr. Foster in class? Why? Why would you want to (or not want to) do this kind of assessment again?

 

Check for Understanding Co-teaching Plan (2)

 

Teacher or co-teacher could just ask the student to respond orally to the reflection questions.

 

Extended Practice

 

1) Students will write a research paper that adresses a particular element of the essential questions.

2) Students will read Frankenstein and answer questions on quizzes that address the essential questions.Students will be provided a paper, digital and audio version of the text. They will also be engaging in a myriad of Reading Apprenticeship activities to increase reading fluency and comprehension. 

3) Students will complete a video project that asks them to answer the essential questions in a sequel to Mary Shelley's text.


Resource(s) available for this section